FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is Ortho-K?
  2. Am I a candidate for Ortho-K?
  3. Is Orthokeratology safe and effective? Does it have FDA approval?
  4. I have dry eyes and had to stop wearing soft lenses. Would orthokeratology lenses be easier or harder to wear because of my dry eyes?
  5. My 12 year old child has myopia and it seems to be getting worse. Is he a candidate for orthokeratology and will it stop his myopia progression?
  6. Hi My son is 6 1/2 years old and have been recently diagnosed with myopia. He has prescription of -1.25 in both the eyes. Is he a candiate for Ortho-K?

  1. What is Ortho-K?

    Ortho-K or orthokeratology is the method of using precisely designed gas permeable contact lenses to reshape the cornea or front tissue of the eye in order to correct the vision. It has been practiced for about 40 years, but has really gone through dramatic improvements in the last 10 years. In the "old" days when I was an Ortho-K patient, orthokeratology involved the programmed application of a series of lenses worn during the day in order to gradually cause a moderate improvement in vision when the lenses were removed. The process often took years and was very complicated and the results were somewhat unpredictable. Modern or advanced orthokeratology involves the use of newer designs known as "reverse geometry" lenses made of highly gas permeable materials, designed to be worn while sleeping. These advances have allowed for very predictable and rapid vision improvements with excellent unaided vision during the day.

  2. Am I a candidate for Ortho-K?

    Ortho-K is most effective for myopia levels under -5.00 diopters and for certain types and levels of astigmatism. The easiest way to tell would be to call or email to schedule a free consultation with Dr. Aller.

  3. Is Orthokeratology safe and effective? Does it have FDA approval?

    Most of the modern systems of advanced orthokeratology have FDA approval and are considered safe and effective means for temporarily correcting refractive errors such as myopia and astigmatism. The safest type of lenses to wear in general and especially for extended wear of up to 30 continuous nights has always been rigid gas permeable lenses. Ortho-k uses only the most gas permeable lenses and because they are removed upon awakening, they are actually worn less than standard lenses and much less than continuous wear or extended wear lenses. In the FDA trials, there were no serious adverse events with orthokeratology lenses.

  4. I have dry eyes and had to stop wearing soft lenses. Would orthokeratology lenses be easier or harder to wear because of my dry eyes?

    There are some potential advantages with orthokeratology for dry eye patients compared to soft contact lenses. Soft lenses frequently act like sponges, drying out the eye (though there are some new lenses that are beneficial). Regardless, for dry eye patients, there is a limit to how many hours soft contact lenses can be worn with optimal comfort. Dry eyes may also make disposable contact lenses not last for their intended lifespan, requiring more frequent replacement. Orthokeratology lenses are worn only while sleeping and while they won't enhance or improve the way eyes feel on awakening, the eyes only get more and more comfortable as the day goes on, rather than getting more and more uncomfortable. For maximum comfort and success, though, I like to treat my patient's dry eye condition prior to beginning orthokeratology.

  5. My 12 year old child has myopia and it seems to be getting worse. Is he a candidate for orthokeratology and will it stop his myopia progression?

    Whether your son is a candidate for correction with orthokeratology depends on his current prescription and would have to be determined after an initial examination. There are several preliminary studies that suggest that orthokeratology treatment causes myopia to progress about 50% less rapidly than if a child were wearing regular soft contact lenses. Many children and adults with progressing myopia can have their myopia progression virtually halted with an alternate therapy using anti-myopia soft lenses, details of which can be found at www.stopmyopianow.com or www.draller.com.

  6. Hi My son is 6 1/2 years old and have been recently diagnosed with myopia. He has prescription of -1.25 in both the eyes. Is he a candiate for Ortho-K?

    Ortho-K is FDA approved for use at any age, somewhat unusual for medication or devices or procedures. For any procedure, the best way to answer the question is to decide if the benefits outweigh the risks. For your son, the risks would be that at his age he might not take proper care of his treatment lenses. Perhaps he won't wash his hands properly or use the proper solutions. Six year olds normally have more difficulty putting lenses on and taking them off, so parents have to expect to be involved. The benefits include seeing well without glasses or daytime contact lenses. Additionally, studies suggest that children that are treated with Orthokeratology experience about 50% less progression of their myopia over time, as compared to those children wearing regular glasses. A good alternative to Ortho-K for your son would also be bifocal contact lenses, as they have been proven to dramatically slow down the progression of myopia by about 90%. For details on this option, go to www.stopmyopianow.com or my office webpage www.draller.com.